Salaat Bento Box

Over 1 billion Muslims pray 5 times a day. They stop what they’re doing at the sound of the adhaan, a lyrical call to prayer and file into the streets and into the Mosques and point themselves towards Mecca and whisper the words of the Quran. Like any ritual, there are elements that have attached themselves to the process, though not required they’ve gained cultural significance.

All of these items function independently of each other and often a devout Muslim will pick and choose these items as they come across them from their travels. These items often have a sentimental value as well as their religious value.

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To pray all a Muslim needs to do is to purify themselves, typically by washing their face and arms with water, but if water is not available sand would do. Then they should orient themselves by pointing themselves towards Mecca, and finally they need to perform the prayer if they are able, while reciting the verses. If they are not physically able to stand they can sit. If they are not physically able to sit they may lie down. The entire process is quite forgiving.

What you will notice is that many Muslims use a prayer rug, this is not necessary but it offers the Muslim a clean surface to bow upon. Shi’ite Muslims use a piece of clay known as a mohr to rest their forehead upon when they bow. Some Muslims like to add additional prayers using a tasbeeh, which looks a lot like a rosary. Some Muslims carry with them compasses and booklets with the directions you should pray in order to line up best with Mecca wherever you might be in the world. Muslim women might choose to cover themselves using a chador.

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I propose to combine all or some of these artifacts into a single object, a Salaat bento box if you will. Compartmentalized and modular, a design minded devotee could purchase the modules they feel is important to them and carry it around in their bags like a lunchbox or camera.

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